Bear Doll Nib

Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk

Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk

Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk

Here is a Lady Bear. This is an animal doll in Paul St John, Mohawk craftsman's "StoryTime Series" This female Bear Doll is dressed in traditional women's. It is the 3rd female Bear doll in the "Storytime" doll series that Paul has made.

This Lady Bear is wearing traditional Wabanaki beaded peaked cap, a short wool coat, a wrap skirt and with accessories that would have been part of what a Wabanaki woman of that era would have. The Wabanaki Confederacy includes the Maliseet, MicMac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot - all located in Maine and all of these except the Penobscot are also located in Eastern Canada... Also included are the Abenaki who located in Vermont and Eastern Canada. Mohawk craftsman, Paul St John has crafted several "StoryTime" legend animal dolls from the Passamaquoddy Legend "Storytime".

(more below) - Paul made this bear's body out of native soft brain tanned deer leather - and painted her head brown with painted facial features. This Bear's peaked cap and wrap skirt are made of vintage black wool - there are Wabanaki double curve designs in white glass seed beads on both.

The skirt has a narrow yellow silk border (attached at even spaces with a small 3 bead design). The bear's short coat is of vintage red wool as are her leggings, her neck scarf and her over the shoulder bag. All have the narrow yellow silk border (like the skirt) and the ribbon is attached with the small 3 bead design. Lady Bear wears leather moccasins of smoked deer leather. The jacket has the traditional double curve beadwork designs on the front - on the back of the jacket is a "Treaty" design which has at its center 2 Xs/4 diamonds - it is from a very early treaty which was commemorated with a wampum treaty belt featuring this symbolic design. She wears a 3 strand white bead necklace that has on the top strand a larger vintage chevron trade bead, her single strand red seed bead bracelet has a. Of a different design than the one on her necklace.

Her shoulder bag is bordered with the thin yellow silk ribbon attached in same fashion as the ribbon on her clothing. She has a red scarf wrapped around her neck which has a small "trade silver brooch".. As does her cotton calico tunic shirt which has 3 trade silver brooches at bottom front center.

This tunic shirt is made of maroon calico cotton with a vintage round orange and black design. Her clothing and accessories are comprised of items that would have been worn by a Wabanaki woman from about 1700- late 1800's - in the materials that would have made up these items in that era. (see the 2nd to last photo for Paul's inspiration for these dolls). Please view all photos in slideshow above - these show all details of this Lady Bear Doll that have been mentioned. Second to last photo shows "StoryTime" a Passamaquoddy drawing of a legend that says animals get together in the winter to listen to and to tell stories.

In the drawing animals dressed in traditional (1700-early 1900) attire - Otters, rabbits, a bear and birds are depicted. On an edge of the drawing (which is cropped out so as to show you more detail of animals/clothing) is a Passamaquoddy word which has been translated as "storytime"...

So very roughly "he/she/they want to listen".... This legend and this drawing are the basis for Paul St John's "StoryTime" series of animal dolls. Not only is this bear doll dressed in Wabanaki attire correct for the era, the very materials Paul uses are traditional and accurate. The doll is made of soft tanned deer leather from the Pleasant Point Maine Passamaquoddy reservation. (Sipayik), vintage wool, fabric and beads are used. Paul has made dolls for several museum exhibits and permanent displays including the Mohawk, the Passamaquoddy, the Maliseet, the MicMac, & the Mt Kearsarge Museums (Mt Kearsarge in NH)... You would be accurate in describing this as a "museum quality" doll. Each doll Paul makes is unique. Paul makes his dolls dressed in traditional attire for different occasions from quite formal to everyday clothing. Please view all the slideshow photos to see the detailed work on this doll.

Last photo is of Paul St John with a friend. John lives in Maine, his mother is Passamaquoddy, Maliseet & MicMac.

He grew up on the Mohawk lands in New York, his father's homeland and is enrolled in the Mohawk tribe.. When I saw his work I knew immediately I needed to offer his great baskets and many other crafts. He makes quilled/beaded moccasins, barrettes, quill & sweetgrass baskets, birch bark boxes, rattles and many other items.

Watch this store for more of his pieces. Can't wait to see what he is going to create next. When boxed this doll will weigh about 2# so..
Lady BEAR Doll #3 Storytime Traditional clothing P St John, Mohawk